Recruiting African-American Barbershops for Prostate Cancer Education

Prostate cancer is the most common cause of cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. African-American men bear a disproportionate burden of prostate cancer diagnosis and mortality. Current guidelines for prostate cancer screening differ among various medical organizations. Therefore, it is important that African-American men have the appropriate information needed to make informed decisions about prostate cancer screening. Unfortunately, a large percentage of African-American men could potentially be excluded from receiving culturally appropriate prostate cancer education. Therefore, a study was designed to recruit and intervene with African-American men and barbershops for increasing prostate cancer screening decision-making. The purpose of this study was to learn effective strategies for recruiting African-American barbershops for prostate cancer education and to determine barbershop proprietors' willingness to allow their barbershops to be used for research. In this paper, we present the outcomes of our recruitment methods for African-American barbershops, including a comparative description of participating and nonparticipating barbershops using the iMark Data System. One-hundred percent of the surveyed proprietors reported that they would allow their clients to learn about prostate cancer. Ninety-six percent reported they would consider allowing their clients to have access to handheld computers to learn about prostate cancer. We conclude from this study that African-American barbershops in general are welcoming environments in which to implement community-based prostate cancer education and public health research.