Jacquelyn Taylor, Ph.D., P.N.P.-B.C., R.N. Selected as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
For more information, contact:
                                                                                    Nurse Faculty Scholars National Program Office
Phone: (877) 738-0737
E-mail: info@rwjfnursefacultyscholars.org
 
 
Jacquelyn Taylor, Ph.D., P.N.P.-B.C., R.N.
 Named a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar
New national program seeks to advance careers of talented junior nursing faculty
 
New Haven, CT (July 22, 2008) ─ Jacquelyn Taylor, Ph.D., P.N.P.-B.C., R.N., an assistant professor at Yale University School of Nursing, was one of 15 junior faculty nationwide to receive an inaugural Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar award. The three-year, $350,000 grant will begin September 1.
 
The award will support her research to examine the interactionbetween genetic and social factors related to blood pressure to understand control of hypertension among hypertensive parents and early risks for high blood pressure among untreated African American children.
 
The award will also support Dr. Taylor’s participation in a training program that will help prepare her for academic leadership and translating evidence into policy and practice initiatives.
 
“I hope to use this generous support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to identify gene-environment factors that affect the onset, development, and severity of hypertension among African Americans and develop nursing interventions to reduce the risks associated with hypertension. Nursing interventions that focus on gene-environment aspects of chronic disease could decrease the prevalence and improve quality of life among patients at risk for high blood pressure,” said Taylor.
 
Her faculty mentors for this research are: Margaret Grey, Dr.P.H., R.N., F.A.A.N, Dean and Annie Goodrich Professor, Yale University School of Nursing;
Richard Lifton, M.D., Ph.D., Chairman, Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine;
Sharon L.R. Kardia, Ph.D., Director, Epidemiology Public Health Genetics, University of Michigan, School of Public Health; and
Barbara Guthrie, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Yale University School of Nursing.
 
Taylor has received fellowships and grants with the following National Institutes of Health (NIH) departments: National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Summer Institute in Cardiovascular Genetic Epidemiology, Summer Institute to Promote Increases in Diversity (SIPID), Washington University, St. Louis Missouri; National Institute of Nursing Research, Minority Supplement grant, summer genetics institute, and Michigan Center for Health Intervention; National Institute on Aging, Research center for minority aging research, and T32 post-doctoral fellow in urban health and aging; NIH K12 scholar University of Michigan, and a departmental international research grant to study hypertension susceptibility genes in West African women.
 
The goal of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program is to develop the next generation of national leaders in academic nursing through career development awards for outstanding junior nursing faculty. The program aims to strengthen the academic productivity and overall excellence of nursing schools by providing mentorship, leadership training, salary and research support to young faculty.
 
Despite a rise in applicants, U.S. nursing schools turn away thousands of prospective students from baccalaureate and masters programs because of an acute shortage of faculty and clinical preceptors, training sites, space and funding constraints. Since the stature of nursing schools and the promotion of nursing faculty are dependent on the quality of the nursing faculty’s scholarly and/or research pursuits, the Nurse Faculty Scholars program seeks to strengthen the link between institutional reputation and faculty success by providing career development and other opportunities to junior faculty.
 
With a large number of faculty nurses set to retire soon, the Nurse Faculty Scholars program also aims to encourage junior nurse faculty to continue on in their roles as educators.
 
The program is run out of the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., Anna D. Wolf chair and professor in the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing directs the program. For more information, go to: www.nursefacultyscholars.org.
 
 
 
Yale University School of Nursing (YSN) enjoys a national and international reputation for excellence in teaching, research and clinical practice. One of Yale University’s professional colleges, YSN is a leading school of nursing in the United States, enjoying a diverse community of scholars and clinicians with a common goal: better health care for all people. More information on YSN may be found at nursing.yale.edu.
 
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country. As the nation's largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to improving the health and health care of all Americans, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, meaningful and timely change. For more than 35 years the Foundation has brought experience, commitment, and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves. When it comes to helping Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need, the Foundation expects to make a difference in your lifetime. For more information, visit www.rwjf.org.
 
Local contact person: Zoe Keller Yale School of Nursing Associate Director of Public Affairs 100 Church Street South, Rm 216 New Haven, CT 06536 203-737-2521