Scholars

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  • Devon Berry, Ph.D., R.N., Director for Innovation and Community Partnerships at Wright State University College of Nursing and Health, is studying the mechanisms by which religiosity influences substance abuse, depression and anxiety, and if these influences persist across religious groups. The study represents the confluence of Dr. Berry’s experiences as a Pastor and as a nursing professor. Learn more about Dr. Berry and his vision for nursing and healthcare>>

  • Tina Bloom, Nurse Faculty Scholar 2011 Cohort

    While working as a research nurse on a federally funded study on intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy, Tina Bloom, Ph.D., R.N., M.P.H. was dumbstruck by the fact that she and her colleagues in a high-risk perinatal unit had been so ill-equipped to recognize and respond to IPV in pregnant women, one of the most common and serious threats to maternal child health. Transformed by this experience and encouraged by mentors to seek a career in nursing research, Dr. Bloom embarked on a journey to improve access for underserved pregnant to culturally appropriate resources to support IPV victims. Read more about this University of Missouri Assistant Professor.

  • While serving as an officer in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps, Felesia Bowen, Ph.D., R.N., A.P.N., was struck by the pervasiveness and devastation of poverty and its effects on community health. That, in part, led Dr. Bowen, Assistant Professor at Rutgers University School of Nursing, to work with underserved communities. Her current research tests the effectiveness of individualized treatment, tailored environmental controls and targeted asthma education in school based clinics on health outcomes of urban children. 

  • Susan Breiteinsten, PhD, RN is interested in developing innovative ways to deliver evidence based programs targeting young children and families experiencing economic and social hardships. For her research project, Dr. Breitenstein plans to develop and test digital delivery of a parent –training program for low-income, minority parents of young children.

  • Abraham Brody, Ph.D., R.N., G.N.P.-B.C. is conducting research to improve the care and health of older adults with dementia and their family caregivers through an interprofessional evidence based practice intervention delivered by home health care teams. Dr. Brody is an Assistant Professor and the Associate Director of the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing at the NYU College of Nursing and Bronx VA GRECC. 

  • Dr. J. Margo Brooks Carthon is an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She is working to examine how nursing interventions such as discharge planning and coordination of care influence repeat hospitalizations among older minority patients. Dr. Brooks Carthon has published regarding nurse staffing and post-surgical mortality and the impact of nurse staffing on patient safety.

  • Dr. Allison Burfield is an Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte School of Nursing.  She strives to improve the care of the elderly. Her current research is focused on improving how medications are used in the older adult to reduce polypharmacy and medication costs, while improving care outcomes and quality of life. Dr. Burfield has published regarding the concomitance of pain and cognition in elderly long-term populations.

  • Dr. Candace Burton is an Assistant Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing.  A former domestic violence advocate, she decided to become a nurse to increase understanding of the impact of relationship-based abuse on women’s health, and her project is focused on the elucidation of biologic and behavioral impacts of the experience of teen dating violence on the health of young women.  Dr. Burton has published regarding adolescent dating abuse and teen dating violence.

  • Dr. Casida is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan School of Nursing in Ann Arbor, Michigan. His research goal is to develop foundational knowledge for the care trajectory of people living with life-sustaining technological devices such as mechanical hearts, and establish a scientific basis for developing interventions to improving healthcare utilization and quality of life outcomes.

  • Dr. Coffman is an Associate Professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She has extensive experience working in the Latino community and is fluent in Spanish. Formerly, she received the American Nurses Foundation Presidential Scholar award. Her current study uses a health literacy instructional framework to improve diabetes self-management in Latina women with type 2 diabetes.