Medication adherance

Medication practice and feminist thought: a theoretical and ethical response to adherence in HIV/AIDS.

Accurate self-administration of antiretroviral medication therapy for HIV/AIDS is a significant clinical and ethical concern because of its implications for individual morbidity and mortality, the health of the public, and escalating healthcare costs. However, the traditional construction of patient medication adherence is oversimplified, myopic, and ethically problematic.

A qualitative study of persons who are 100% adherent to antiretroviral therapy

 This qualitative study examined the medication-taking behaviors and attitudes of participants determined to be 100% adherers to antiretroviral therapy from a NIH-funded study testing a 12-week telephone adherence intervention. Using open-ended questions, interviewers collected data on a sample of 13 informants, whose medication adherence to a randomly selected antiretroviral medication was 100%, based on a 30-day data collection using electronic event monitoring (EEM). The analysis revealed 'successful medication management' as the core category or main theme.

A qualitative study of persons who are 100% adherent to antiretroviral therapy.

This qualitative study examined the medication-taking behaviors and attitudes of participants determined to be 100% adherers to antiretroviral therapy from a NIH-funded study testing a 12-week telephone adherence intervention. Using open-ended questions, interviewers collected data on a sample of 13 informants, whose medication adherence to a randomly selected antiretroviral medication was 100%, based on a 30-day data collection using electronic event monitoring (EEM). The analysis revealed 'successful medication management' as the core category or main theme.

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