Stroke

Quality of Life and Loneliness in Stroke Survivors Living in Appalachia

Background and Purpose: Negative outcomes of stroke are associated with poorer quality of life (QoL) and impact stroke recovery. The purpose of this study was to characterize QoL and loneliness in a sample of rural Appalachian stroke survivors within 1 year of stroke.

Effects of Tai Chi on Physical Function and Quality of Life in Chronic Stroke

Background: Poor physical function and quality of life are ubiquitous post-stroke. Effective interventions to improve physical function and quality of life for stroke survivors are critically needed.

Objective: Examine the effect of a Tai Chi (TC) intervention on physical function and quality of life.

Slipping, Tripping and Rapid Ambulation are Key Fall Triggers for Stroke Survivors

Background: Stroke survivors fall up to seven times more annually than healthy adults of a similar age. The inability to recover balance from slipping, tripping, or rapid ambulation accounts for the majority of falls, while balance control can prevent falls. An examination of the triggers for falls and balance recovery strategies for near falls is crucial for fall prevention in stroke survivors.

Purpose: To examine the self-reported triggers for falls and balance recovery strategies for near falls among community-dwelling stroke survivors.

Stroke Survivors in a 12-week Yang-Style Tai Chi Intervention have Fewer Falls

Background: Compared to same age healthy adults, stroke survivors experience 7 times as many falls annually. Such falls often cause hip or other fractures, loss of mobility, and increased fear of falling resulting in social isolation and/or dependence. Effective interventions for preventing falls among stroke survivors are critically needed. Tai Chi exercise has been shown to significantly reduce the number of falls in healthy older adults.

Tai Chi and SilverSneakers® Interventions Improve Aerobic Endurance in Older Stroke Survivors

Background: Physical activity reduces recurrent stroke risk, yet suitable community-based programs are lacking. Tai Chi (TC) and SilverSneakers® (SS) can be easily adapted for persons with disabilities. TC integrates physical movements with mindfulness, while SS focuses on strength and range of movement.

Purpose: To examine the effects of TC and SS interventions on physical functioning compared to Usual Care (UC).

Leg Strength and Gait Speed Predict Enrollment in an Exercise Study among Stroke Survivors with Mild-Moderate Disability

Background: Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and is the major contributor to physical and cognitive disability among this population. Exercise is an important aspect of stroke rehabilitation to reduce disability.

Objective: To determine if functional disability, physical function, cognitive impairment, age or gender are predictive of enrollment in an exercise study among stroke survivors with mild-moderate disability.

Aerobic Endurance and Leg Strength are Predictive of Gait Velocity among Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors

Background: Gait velocity is an objective, fundamental indicator of post-stroke walking ability. Most stroke survivors have diminished aerobic endurance and paretic leg strength, with one or both of these conditions affecting their gait velocity. Other reported underlying factors affecting gait velocity include functional disability, balance and cognitive impairment.

Objective: To examine potential independent predictors of gait velocity in chronic stroke.

Predictors of Stroke Survivors’ Enrollment in an Exercise Study

Background: Screening measures prior to study enrollment are needed to determine safety and minimize participant burden. Our objective was to determine if functional disability, physical function, cognitive impairment, age or gender were predictive of enrollment in an exercise study. Methods: This observational study used cross-sectional data from 233 stroke survivors with mild-moderate disability, who consented to be screened for potential study enrollment.

The Effect of Tai Chi on Physical Function, Fall Rates, and Quality of Life Among Older Stroke Survivors

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of a 12-week Tai Chi (TC) intervention on physical function and quality of life.

DESIGN: Single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

SETTING: General community.

PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling survivors of stroke (N=145; 47% women; mean age, 70y; time poststroke: 3y; ischemic stroke: 66%; hemiparesis: 73%) who were aged ≥50 years and were ≥3 months poststroke.

Predictors of Depressive Symptoms among Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors

BACKGROUND: Depression is a common yet often unrecognized consequence of stroke, affecting between 25% and 70% of all survivors. Untreated depression post-stroke leads to a poorer prognosis and increased mortality. However, the pattern and profile of post-stroke depression in chronic stroke are poorly understood.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the independent predictors of depressive symptoms in chronic stroke.

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