Screening and Assessment

Recruitment of African American Women to a Walking Program: Eligibility, Ineligibility, and Attrition During Screening

 The purposes of this study were to identify strategies successful in the recruitment of African American (AA) women to a home-based walking program and to examine factors that contribute to attrition, eligibility, and ineligibility during the recruitment screening protocol. Of the 696 women who contacted the researchers, 281 (40.4%) women enrolled in the study, 227 (32.6%) were lost to attrition, and 188 (27%) were ineligible.

Underestimation of breast cancer risk: influence on screening behavior.

 PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To describe perceived breast cancer risk, identify the percentage of women with inaccurate risk perceptions, and examine the influence of perceived and objective risk on screening behavior.
DESIGN: Descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional.
SETTING: Community settings in a metropolitan area on the western coast of the United States.
SAMPLE: Multicultural sample of 184 English-speaking women (57% non-Caucasian, X age = 47 +/- 12 years) who have never been diagnosed with cancer.

The Influence of Social Support on Breast Cancer Screening in a Multicultural Community Sample

 Purpose/Objectives: To examine the relationship between women’s reported social support and their adherence to recommended breast cancer screening guidelines.
Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional survey.
Setting: Community women’s organizations throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.
Sample: 833 mostly low-income women with a mean age of 46.2 years from three racial or ethnic groups (i.e., Latina, Caucasian, and African American) who were not breast cancer survivors.

Recruiting African-American Barbershops for Prostate Cancer Education

Prostate cancer is the most common cause of cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. African-American men bear a disproportionate burden of prostate cancer diagnosis and mortality. Current guidelines for prostate cancer screening differ among various medical organizations. Therefore, it is important that African-American men have the appropriate information needed to make informed decisions about prostate cancer screening.

Revision of the Abuse Assessment Screen to Address Non-Lethal Strangulation

The Abuse Assessment Screen has been used since 1987 to identify and assess for intimate partner violence in a wide variety of clinical and research settings. It has been translated and successfully used in at least 7 languages in addition to English. Meanwhile, a growing body of research indicates that nonlethal strangulation (commonly called "choking") is a significant form of intimate partner violence and that choking has substantial consequences for the health of the woman. This paper describes the modification of the Abuse Assessment Screen to include "choking."

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