Postpartum

The Physical and Social Environment of Sleep in Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Postpartum Women

Objective:to describe the physical and social environment of sleep self-management in postpartum socioeconomically disadvantaged women.

Design: Descriptive, exploratory design.

Setting:Participants were recruited in the hospital after giving birth. Data were collected in participant homes after discharge.

Participants: Postpartum women on Medicaid with normal healthy infants.

Intimate Partner Violence and the Childbearing Year: Maternal and Infant Health Consequences

Intimate partner violence (IPV) against women is a significant public health problem with negative physical and mental health consequences. Pregnant women are not immune to IPV, and as many as 4% to 8% of all pregnant women are victims of partner violence. Among pregnant women, IPV has been associated with poor physical health outcomes such as increased sexually transmitted diseases, preterm labor, and low-birth-weight infants. This article focuses on the physical health consequences of IPV for mothers and their infants.

Persevering Through Postpartum Fatigue

OBJECTIVE: To construct a substantive theory of postpartum fatigue. DESIGN: Grounded theory. SETTING: Participants were recruited in the hospital after delivery and interviewed in their homes. PARTICIPANTS: Thirteen primiparae (n=5) and multiparae (n=8) women between 2 and 5 weeks postpartum from diverse ethnic, age, obstetric, and financial contexts were theoretically sampled. RESULTS: Persevering was the central human process around which the grounded theory emerged.

A Depressive Symptoms Responsiveness Model for Differentiating Fatigue from Depression in the Postpartum Period

Fatigue is both a symptom and a predictor of depression in women after childbirth. At the same time, postpartum fatigue is experienced by most non-depressed women. Health care providers experientially know that not all women who experience postpartum fatigue will manifest depression. However, while researchers agree that fatigue and depression are distinct concepts, they have not yet identified a means for describing or measuring this distinctness. A new model proposing how fatigue may be differentiated from depression after childbirth is presented.

Severe Fatigue and Depressive Symptoms in Lower-Income Urban Postpartum Women

The purpose of this study was to identify whether severe postpartum fatigue at 1 and 3 months postpartum was associated with depressive symptomatology at 6 months in lower-income urban women. A convenience sample of 43 lower-income postpartum women completed the Modified Fatigue Symptoms Checklist and Edinburgh Postpartum Depression scale at 1, 3, and 6 months postpartum. Participants who were severely fatigued at both 1 and 3 months postpartum were significantly more likely to exhibit depressive symptomatology at 6 months.

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