Grocery store

Fruit and vegetable access differs by community racial composition and socioeconomic position in Detroit, Michigan.

OBJECTIVE: To compare the availability, selection, quality, and price of fresh fruit and vegetables at food stores in four Detroit-area communities: 1) predominately African-American, low socioeconomic position (SEP); 2) racially heterogeneous, low SEP; 3) predominately African-American, middle SEP; and 4) racially heterogeneous, middle SEP.
DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational survey, conducted fall 2002.
SETTING: Detroit, Michigan

Availability of Commonly Consumed and Culturally Specific Fruits and Vegetables in African-American and Latino Neighborhoods

 Although the importance of culture in shaping individual dietary behaviors is well-documented, cultural food preferences have received limited attention in research on the neighborhood food environment. The purpose of this study was to assess the availability of commonly consumed and culturally specific fruits and vegetables in retail food stores located in majority African-American and Latino neighborhoods in southwest Chicago, IL.

Neighborhood retail food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in a multiethnic urban population.

 PURPOSE: To examine relationships between the neighborhood food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in a multiethnic urban population.
DESIGN: Analysis of cross-sectional survey and observational data.
SETTING: One hundred forty-six neighborhoods within three large geographic communities of Detroit, Michigan.
SUBJECTS: Probability sample of 919 African-American, Latino, and white adults.

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