Chronic illness

Study Protocol: Mobile Improvement of Self-Management Ability through Rural Technology (mI SMART).

There are 62 million Americans currently residing in rural areas who are more likely to have multiple chronic conditions and be economically disadvantaged, and in poor health, receive less recommended preventive services and attend fewer visits to health care providers. Recent advances in mobile healthcare (mHealth) offer a promising new approach to solving health disparities and improving chronic illness care.

Loneliness and quality of life in chronically ill rural older adults

BACKGROUND: Loneliness is a contributing factor to various health problems in older adults, including complex chronic illness, functional decline, and increased risk of mortality.

Community-based Yang-style Tai Chi is Safe and Feasible in Chronic Stroke: A Pilot Study

OBJECTIVE: Examine the safety and feasibility of a 12-week Tai Chi intervention among stroke survivors.

DESIGN: Two-group, prospective pilot study with random allocation.

SETTING: Outpatient rehabilitation facility.

SUBJECTS: Stroke survivors ≥50 years and at ≥three months post-stroke.

Loneliness and Quality of Life in Chronically Ill Rural Older Adults

Background: Loneliness is a contributing factor to various health problems in older adults, including complex chronic illness, functional decline, and increased risk of mortality. 

Original Research: Loneliness and Quality of Life in Chronically Ill Rural Older Adults

Background: Loneliness is a contributing factor to various health problems in older adults, including complex chronic illness, functional decline, and increased risk of mortality.

Loneliness, Depression, Social Support, and Quality of Life in Older Chronically Ill Appalachians

This study's purpose was to describe loneliness and to examine the relationships between loneliness, depression, social support, and QOL in chronically ill, older Appalachians. In-person interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 60 older, chronically ill, community-dwelling, and rural adults. Those with dementia or active grief were excluded.

Predictors of Loneliness in U.S. Adults Over Age Sixty-Five

 The purpose of this study was to examine sociodemographic and health-related risks for loneliness among older adults using Health and Retirement Study Data. Overall prevalence of loneliness was 19.3%. Marital status, self-report of health, number of chronic illnesses, gross motor impairment, fine motor impairment, and living alone were predictors of loneliness. Age, female gender, use of home care, and frequency of healthcare visits were not predictive. Loneliness is a prevalent problem for older adults in the United States with its own health-related risks.

An examination of the relationships among gender, health status, social support, and HIV-related stigma.

This secondary analysis used E. Goffman's (1963) model of stigma to examine how social support and health status are related to HIV stigma, after controlling for specific sociodemographic factors, and how these relationships differed between men and women living with HIV. Baseline data from 183 subjects in a behavioral randomized clinical trial were analyzed using multigroup structural equation modeling. Women reported significantly higher levels of stigma than men after controlling for race, history of injection drug use, and exposure category.

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